Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI)

 

Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory Summary

  What does the tool measure? The CAHAI assess upper limb functional recovery.
  What types of clients can the tool be used for? The CAHAI can be used with, but is not limited to clients with stroke.
  Is this a screening or assessment tool? Assessment
Time to administer An average of 20 to 25 minutes.
  Versions CAHAI, CAHAI-9, CAHAI-8, CAHAI-7.
Other Languages English, French, German, Hebrew and Italian.
Measurement Properties
  Reliability – Two studies have examined the internal consistency of the CAHAI and its shortened versions and reported excellent internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha.
– One study examined the test-retest reliability of the CAHAI and reported excellent test-retest reliability using using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC).
– No studies have examined the intra-rater reliability of the CAHAI.
– One study examined the inter-rater reliability of the CAHAI and reported excellent inter-rater reliability using ICC.
  Validity

Content:
One study examined the content validity of the CAHAI and reported that items were generated from a review of scientific literature and from input from clients with stroke, their family and caregivers. Items with poor frequency endorsement, difficulty to be standardized, and high inter-item correlation were eliminated.

Criterion:
Concurrent Validity:
One study examined the concurrent validity of the CAHAI and the CAHAI-9 and reported that the CAHAI-9 was not able to predict individual scores and individual change scores of the CAHAI, using regression analysis.

Predictive Validity:
No studies have examined the predictive validity of the CAHAI.

Construct:
Convergent validity:
Three studies examined convergent validity of the CAHAI and reported excellent correlations between all versions of the CAHAI and the Action Research Arm Test, and all versions of the CAHAI and the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), and poor to moderate correlations between the CAHAI and the CMSA shoulder pain score, using Pearson Correlation.

Known Groups:
Three studies examined longitudinal/known groups validity of all versions of the CAHAI and reported that all versions are able to distinguish changes between subjects with acute and chronic stroke, and mild from severe impairments, using ROC curve (Receiver Operation Characteristic).

  Floor/Ceiling Effects No studies have examined the floor/ceiling effects of the CAHAI.
  Sensitivity/ Specificity No studies have examined the sensitivity/specificity of the CAHAI.
  Does the tool detect change in patients? One study examined the responsiveness of the CAHAI and reported that the minimal detectable change between two evaluations in stable patients was 6.3 points.
  Acceptability The CAHAI is highly accepted by clients with stroke since is made up of real-life and non-gender specific items.
Feasibility The administration of the CAHAI is easy and quick to perform.
How to obtain the tool? The CAHAI can be obtained free of charge by visiting the official website: http://www.cahai.ca