Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH)

 

DASH Evaluation Summary

  What does the tool measure? Upper extremity disability and pain.
  What types of clients can the tool be used for? Individuals with musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limb.
  Is this a screening or assessment tool? Assessment
Time to administer Five minutes.
  Versions
  • DASH
  • QuickDASH
Other Languages Afrikaans, Arabic, Armenian, Chinese (Hong Kong), Chinese (Taiwan), Czech, Danish, Dutch, English (Australia), English (Hong Kong), English (South Africa), Finnish, French Canadian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lithuanian, Malay, Norwegian, Persian (Iran), Polish, Portugese (Brazil), Portugese (Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Sinhala (Sri Lanka), Spanish (Argentina), Spanish (Puerto Rico), Spanish (Spain), Swedish, Thai, Turkish.
Measurement Properties
  Reliability

Internal consistency:
No studies have reported on the internal consistency of the DASH among patients with stroke.

Intra-rater:
No studies have reported on the intra-rater reliability of the DASH among patients with stroke.

Inter-rater:
No studies have reported on the inter-rater reliability of the DASH among patients with stroke.

Test-retest:
No studies have reported on the test-retest reliability of the DASH among patients with stroke.

  Validity

Content:
The DASH was developed by item generation (clinical expert input, literature review and patient focus groups) and item reduction (expert review, and psychometric and clinimetric analysis).
One study that examined the content validity of the DASH in a sample of patients with stroke suggested a disordered rating scale structure and item hierarchy that is not suitable for clinical use.

Criterion:
Concurrent:
No studies have reported on the concurrent validity of the DASH among patients with stroke.

Predictive:
No studies have reported on the predictive validity of the DASH among patients with stroke.

Construct:
Convergent/Discriminant:
One study reported moderate correlations between manual ability and pain.

Known Groups:
No studies have reported on the known-groups validity of the DASH among patients with stroke.

  Floor/Ceiling Effects No studies have reported on the floor/ceiling effects of the DASH among patients with stroke.
  Does the tool detect change in patients? No studies have reported on the responsiveness among patients with stroke.
  Acceptability The DASH is simple to comprehend, quick to complete and is comprised of real-life, non-gender specific items. Due to limited research regarding patient acceptance, this tool may be more suitable for patients with mild impairment.
Feasibility The DASH is a versatile measure that can be used for clinical or research purposes. However there is insufficient research regarding use of the DASH with patients with stroke and concerns that without testing, the clinical utility of the DASH remains unknown.
How to obtain the tool? Visit the DASH website for more information: http://www.dash.iwh.on.ca/home

* Initially developed for a traumatic-brain injured population, the psychometric properties of the tool with this population are described in the administration guide of the too